Child photography

How to Take Stunning Photos in Overcast Light

Light happens to be one of my favourite photography topics. I adore all things light. Finding light, manipulating light, capturing light…it’s a passion of mine. I also happen to love a good challenge so the more challenging the light the more enticing it is for me to work with and capture it in a technically strong and creative way. In the past I’ve found myself a little disappointed when the outdoors has given me overcast light. However, in time I’ve found ways to work with overcast light in ways that can be beautiful too. Here are some of my tips for working with overcast light.

1. Create portraits or environmental portraits

Overcast light can be beautiful portraiture light. The dynamic range or difference between the highlights and shadows in your scene is lessened as compared to shooting in stronger light. This creates more even lighting in your scene. This even lighting falls beautifully across a subject resulting in smooth and even skin with little worry about distracting highlights or shadows.

When creating portraits in overcast light I make sure that I’m still aware of where the sun should be. If you are unsure of where the sun should be you can look for soft shadows around you. The sun is always opposite the direction in which a shadow is falling. Or there are numerous free apps such as Sky View Lite, Sky Guide and others that will superimpose the sun’s placement when you hold your phone up to the sky when using the app. Knowing where the sun is will help you still use overcast light in a good way. I like to have the light behind me, falling flat over my subject. This creates beautiful catchlights in your subject’s eyes, especially if your subject’s head is tilted upwards just a touch, and soft and even skin tones. 

ISO 400, 105mm, 2.8f, 1/1000SS

ISO 400, 105mm, 2.8f, 1/1000SS

2. Embrace the mood within overcast light

Overcast light emits a certain type of mood. Usually one of peace, tranquility and calm or sometimes even moody drama. Play this up! Capture images in a way that enhances the calm or moody drama in your surrounding.

ISO 800, 35mm, 2.8f, 1/4000SS

ISO 800, 35mm, 2.8f, 1/4000SS

3. Incorporate juxtaposition

As just noted overcast light typically suggests calm or moody drama within an image. Incorporating elements into your image that are contradictory to these moods will likely draw attention to your image. Think energy within a moody scene, like a dancing child or movement of any kind.

ISO 2000, 120mm, 3.5f, 1/1600SS

ISO 2000, 120mm, 3.5f, 1/1600SS

4. Focus in on detail

Another favourite technique of mine in many situations is to simply focus in on details. When the light is not dynamic drawing attention to a simple detail can still contribute to a powerful and stunning image.  

ISO 200, 50mm, 2.8f, 1/1600SS

ISO 200, 50mm, 2.8f, 1/1600SS

5. Use interesting compositions

Overcast light is for the most part flat. Incorporating elements of composition that enhance depth can result in a more interesting and dynamic image. Challenge yourself to find creative composition after all you’ll be working with light that isn’t all that hard to manage so now is the time to take risks and challenge yourself with experimenting in composition.

CreativeCompOvercastLight.jpg

6. Incorporate a creative technique

I really enjoy thinking up ways in which I can push my images creatively. By using natural elements around me like shurbs, tree branches, flowers or other products like a prism or by freelensing a bit of artistic flair can be infused into an image making it unique and captivating even in overcast light.

ISO 200, 105, 3.2f, 1250ss

ISO 200, 105, 3.2f, 1250ss

Next time you are given overcast light remember these tips! Stunning images can be captured in every lighting situation!

Easter-3 Must Capture Perspectives

In my home Easter is a fun time! My children always request Easter egg decorating as an activity this time of year. They literally sit for hours perfecting their egg masterpieces while I snap images on my camera. After awhile though I begin to realize I’ve taken the same image over and over again just with a different egg. Ha, ha! Okay, I better mix things up! In situations like this where my children are still and engaged in an activity I like to add variety to my images by changing my perspective. This allows me to get several different captures out of a single photo shoot.

1. Eye Level

This is certainly the most traditional perspective when capturing an image. This straight on, at eye level, capture is a must have. You can also try for variety in this perspective by capturing different facial expressions and maybe an image or two with eye contact as well.

ISO 1250, 35mm, 2.8f, 1/250 SS

ISO 1250, 35mm, 2.8f, 1/250 SS

2. Bird’s eye view

I really love this point of view. This is certainly a perspective that us parents can all relate to as we often view our children from this view point. Whenever I see images captured from above a child I find I’m filled with that parental feeling of nurturing.

ISO 1250, 35mm, 2.8f, 1/250 SS

ISO 1250, 35mm, 2.8f, 1/250 SS

One way you can add variety within this perspective is to capture the bird’s eye view point from in front of but also from behind your subject.

ISO 1250, 35mm, 2.8f, 1/250 SS

ISO 1250, 35mm, 2.8f, 1/250 SS

3. Details

Details are beautiful but so easily overlooked. I am making a more conscious effort to capture the details around me. You can certainly vary how you capture your details as well and use various different perspectives. Also, don’t be afraid to shoot at a wide aperture which will draw attention to your subject and blur out your background.

ISO 1250, 35mm, 2.8f, 1/250 SS

ISO 1250, 35mm, 2.8f, 1/250 SS

There! All done! Now I have at least 4 or more Instagram worthy images ready to be posted! That sounds like a win in my books! Happy Easter friends! I hope you have some fun and relaxation planned with your family!


all content and images © Gina Yeo Photography, 2019




4 Tips that Draw Attention to your Subject

There are many different reasons photographers pick up the camera.  It could be to document a moment and preserve a memory or perhaps to create art, or maybe it’s a combination of both, or perhaps photography is a business for the photographer? Regardless the reasons behind why a photographer captures an image I wager a bet that there is a subject in the photographer’s frame. Capturing an image in a way that draws attention to your subject will create stronger more dynamic images. Here are four elements that I use in order to draw attention to my subject.

1. Light

Light is hands down one of my favourite elements in which to bring attention to my subject. The power of light is undeniable.  Thinking about how you can light your subject in a way that makes him or her shine is a sure way of drawing attention to your subject.

ISO 1000, 35mm, 2.8f, 1/800SS

ISO 1000, 35mm, 2.8f, 1/800SS

ISO 400, 35mm, 2.8f, 1/800SS

ISO 400, 35mm, 2.8f, 1/800SS

2. Composition

Composition is an in depth topic. It’s vast theory is extremely powerful and can help draw your viewer into your image towards your subject, can help lead your viewer’s eye through the frame and can help tell the story you intend through your images.

Two favourite compositional techniques that I often use which draw attention towards my subject are framing and filling the frame.

Fames are a very effective way in which to define your subject within an image. I enjoying looking for and finding all kinds of frames and I love creating them too. There are many types of natural frames outdoors such as trees or even grasses. There’s also artificial frames which can be structures like bridges or park equipment. When I’m outdoors my favourite kinds of frames to find usually involve something sparkly. I enjoy shooting through shrubbery which creates that frame I want but also adds a touch of sparkle magic into my images.

ISO 400, 135mm, 3.5f, 1/4000

ISO 400, 135mm, 3.5f, 1/4000

A second way composition can be used to draw attention to your subject is to fill the frame. Filling the frame ensures that your subject is front and centre within the image. Distractions are often completely eliminated and there is nothing else to focus on but your subject.

ISO 100, 35mm, 4f, 1/320SS

ISO 100, 35mm, 4f, 1/320SS

3. Selective focus  

When we view an image our eyes are typically drawn to areas of focus. Our brains tend to feel more comfortable with in focus aspects of an image and will be drawn to areas of focus before exploring out of focus areas within an image. The use of purposeful and selective focus can help draw your viewer’s eye into an image and towards your main subject creating impact.

Dandelion.jpg

4. Colour

Colour is a high attractant and will almost always draw attention towards your subject especially when that colour is bright and bold against a more neutral background. I use this technique often and have a collection of bright and colourful accessories and clothing for my children.

ISO 640, 105mm, 2.8f, 1/1000SS

ISO 640, 105mm, 2.8f, 1/1000SS

These are only a few ways in which a photographer can draw attention to a subject. There are many more. In fact, I think in the future I’ll write under this topic again with different tips!

Thanks for reading!

4 Tips to Capture Fun-Filled Outdoor Images

Today’s blog post is incredibly exciting because I get to introduce the first featured artist here at The Photographer’s Notebook. I couldn’t be more thrilled to introduce Jillian Baudry who is a photographer residing in the south of France. She truly captures the most stunning images of her daughter and family in beautiful and colourful ways! Her use of light is both breathtaking and inspiring! I know you will enjoy what she has to say so without further ado lets dive into Jillian’s expertise on capturing fun-filled outdoor images!


Featured Photographer Post By: Jillian Baudry

Whatever the weather, our little family is at it's happiest outdoors and there's nothing I love more than being able to capture those adventures with my camera! Here are a few tips I've picked up along the way to make our outdoor time fun, avoid meltdowns and return home with images I love.

1. Plan a fun activity

I discovered early on that little ones don't have much patience for sitting still and posing! My little girl is constantly on the move and it can be a challenge to slow her down enough to be able to take some shots. With this in mind, when we go outside and I intend to take photos, I plan a fun activity. Something such as collecting shells, flying a kite, or throwing sticks in the river not only means she enjoys her time outside, but it also keeps her occupied and in one area for long enough to let me take some shots. She's now learned to associate my camera with having fun outdoors rather than standing and posing for boring photos, so it's a win-win !  We are creating happy memories at the same time and after all, aren't these the moments we all want to record, the reason why so many of us picked up the camera in the first place? Activities don't have to be complicated or costly. There are so many things you can come up with. It can even be something as simple as examining a pine cone for really young children, anything that slows them down a little bit and means they don't feel uncomfortable in front of the camera. 

ISO 500, 20mm, 4f, 1/2500SS

ISO 500, 20mm, 4f, 1/2500SS

2. Move around

I rarely shoot posed images and I don't direct my subjects, but the scene as it appears right in front of me isn't always perfectly photogenic. My solution is to move myself, so much easier than trying to move my little subject and disrupting her play! Try walking around your subject and moving closer or further away. That way, you can utilize different kinds of lighting, include more or less of the surrounding environment to tell your story or find a less cluttered background for your subject. Don't forget to get really close to preserve those important little details too, such as a tiny hand holding out a found treasure or the way your little one's hair blows in the wind. Shooting from above or below can also minimize background distractions, provide variety and help focus on the details.

ISO 250, 20mm, 2.8f, 1/1600SS

ISO 250, 20mm, 2.8f, 1/1600SS

ISO 800, 20mm, 3.5f, 1/1000SS

ISO 800, 20mm, 3.5f, 1/1000SS

3. Add some color

A quick glance at my images will tell you that I'm a big fan of color! I love to add a pop of color whenever I can, as it not only helps add contrast and interest to my images but also helps me capture the fun-filled mood and energy of our outdoor adventures. Although she's only 4, my little girl already insists on making her own decisions on what to wear. We avoid arguments by me offering her a choice of brightly colored tops, boots, umbrellas etc. leaving the exact details up to her. Along with my beloved wide angle lens, using a pop of vibrant color helps me to create images with a fun, dynamic feel.

ISO 200, 20mm, 3.2f, 1/4000SS

ISO 200, 20mm, 3.2f, 1/4000SS

4. Be prepared

We always dress appropriately for our trips outside but very often, we need a dry change of shoes and a towel too. We've fallen in puddles, Daddy wades into the river when necessary to rescue an escaped shoe, our dog has fallen in the canal...In fact we've found a whole host of ways to return back to the car wet and muddy! A dry change of clothes, a hot or cold drink and a snack for everyone helps the adventure end on a happy note amid promises to do this again soon!

ISO 320, 50mm, 2.8f, 1/1000SS

ISO 320, 50mm, 2.8f, 1/1000SS


Jillian Baudry

Jillian is a natural light photographer, living in the south of France, creating colorful, light-infused imagery of her family's outdoor adventures. Living between the Mediterranean and the mountains, you'll usually find her out and about, camera in hand, exploring with hubby and her little girl with their rescue dog Hector leading the way.

You can find Jillian on:

Instagram

Website

Bio image.jpg

9 Tips to Encourage Subject Cooperation

I’ll admit it. I’m extremely fortunate to have, for the most part, cooperative subjects to photograph but trust me it’s not always this way. I also have two preteens and as they age their opinion in how I photograph them in addition to their compliance plays a role in how and when I capture them.

I am also not a documentary photographer. Yes, I enjoy capturing everyday moments but photography feeds my creative soul and because of that I have a need to capture everyday moments within my creative vision. Sometimes I’m a little more relaxed with my vision for an image but sometimes I do aim for a specific outcome. Over time I’ve learned a few tricks and tips that help me achieve the images I want and allow for my children to have fun with my photography too.

1. Short and sweet for all vision focused images

I’m often a vision focused photographer. What this means is that I have an idea in my creative mind about what or how I might like to capture a memory. Before I even ask my children to participate I set up every single detail from light manipulation to creative props to camera settings and so on. I’ll even take a test shot to ensure my settings are spot on and that I’m on the right track for what my vision is. Only after I’m completely ready will I ask my little subject to pop into the scene. I quickly snap away and get what I want within a few short minutes.

For example, in the image below I knew what I wanted to capture and how. I was completely set up and prepared before I asked my daughter to start twirling for me. She only twirled a few times before I knew I had what I wanted. This ready beforehand and short photo shoot session makes it fun and easy on everyone.

ISO 800, 35mm, 2.8f, 1/640SS

ISO 800, 35mm, 2.8f, 1/640SS

2. Make it fun

In addition to making any planned photo shoot short and sweet I also try to come up with fun photo shoot ideas. I find things like movement and play are openly embraced by my children. I also know that almost any type of outdoor play will be welcomed by my children. Outdoor adventures are always the most fun and easiest moments for me to capture. Also, if I incorporate an idea that is mildly dangerous to me or entertaining for my children I know my children are bound to participate.

For example, my son loves to throw snow balls at my camera lens! I just make sure I stand far enough away out of full impact reach!

ISO 250, 92mm, 4f, 1/2000SS

ISO 250, 92mm, 4f, 1/2000SS

3. Use a longer lens

I prefer longer lenses anyway but I find the use of a longer lens important when my children are just not quite in the mood to be photographed. Outdoors, I use a long lens pretty much exclusively. This allows for my children to run and play and be themselves while I can maintain distance and hang back a little. My longer lenses also allow for me to experiment creatively with things like light or composition or even creative additions into an image like a prism.

ISO 500, 190mm, 2.8f, 1/640SS

ISO 500, 190mm, 2.8f, 1/640SS

4. Ask for their input into a photo shoot

I use this often with my children. I let them know that I’d really like to photograph them and tell them that they get to come up with what we do.

For example my daughter has been working really hard at reading and I told her I wanted to capture this milestone. I asked her to plan the shoot in her room. When I showed up she had all these sparkly crystals she’d found that she wanted me to use. She willingly participated in the photo shoot and I captured that milestone image I wanted. She was super excited to see how her idea of the crystals came out in the final image.

ISO 1000, 35mm, 2.0f, 1/200SS

ISO 1000, 35mm, 2.0f, 1/200SS

5. Be sure to make a effort if they want something captured

This is similar to the above point but different. I almost always have my camera with me but there are times when I actually don’t feel like picking up my camera. I remember a particular hike we were on last summer when we came upon a field of beautiful fox tails. I was feeling disappointed about the smoke from forest fires ruining the mountain view but my oldest was extremely excited about running and playing in the field of fox tails. As she was playing she asked if I was going to photograph her. I remember not feeling all that interested in picking up my camera but I did because she wanted me to preserve that memory for her. Looking back now I’m glad I have those moments captured. When they ask for an image I always make an effort to do just that.

ISO 100, 35mm, 2.2f, 1/2500SS

ISO 100, 35mm, 2.2f, 1/2500SS

6. Capture what they love

I find if I ask my children to do something that they love that they’ll be way more cooperative as subjects. My oldest adores going to the park to feed the Chickadees and Nuthatch. These little birds will actually fly right up and sit on an open hand. Yesterday, she asked to go to the park and when I agreed she got herself ready, without any prompting, in a winter coat, toque, matching scarf and her more attractive boots…all items I’d be thrilled with photographing her in.

ISO 55, 190mm, 2.8f, 1/640SS

ISO 55, 190mm, 2.8f, 1/640SS

7. Capture moments not poses

I came across an image the other day when I was browsing all the beautiful images grouped into #thephotographersnotebook on Instagram. I absolutely love what this Momma had to say:

“It always goes like this when we actually plan a photo - I end up loving the photo that I just randomly took for fun before we took the “planned” photo! I’ll never tire of real and authentic shots. To me they tell a story, like this beautiful one of my amazing little girl who has the biggest heart of all.” Amy Louise.

Image Credit:  @agirlwandering

Image Credit: @agirlwandering

What Amy Louise had to say completely resonated with me. I love portraiture. That beautiful soulful connection with the camera in a gorgeous well lit pose is captivating to me. However, my children have zero interest in standing a certain way to allow for light to fall in the perfect Rembrandt Triangle while staring deep into my camera. I’ve tried this. It doesn’t work out well. This feels rigid and uncomfortable for them and can be frustrating for me. I’ve learned to let go of having this expectation and instead aim to capture a relaxed portrait. I adore these types of portraits even more and the authenticity that comes from images like this. In a relaxed portrait personality shines through and these are always the images I love the most.

ISO 500, 125mm, 3.2f, 1/640SS

ISO 500, 125mm, 3.2f, 1/640SS

8. Photograph only the details

Yup, I do get that look. The rolling eyes, the intentional defiant expression, the “I’m not going to look pretty on camera” glare, the “There’s no way I’m participating” pose. In these situations I switch directions and focus in on details.

For example, my son did not want to be photographed prior to me capturing this image. He was giving me the frozen eye roll glare. However, he’d found a rock that was shaped like a bear and when I suggested we capture that detail he was all in.

ISO 200, 105mm, 3.2f, 1/1000SS

ISO 200, 105mm, 3.2f, 1/1000SS

9. Take no for an answer

Sometimes putting down the camera is the best answer. I want my children to feel like participants in our photo shoots and enjoy my camera too. So if they are truly not in the mood I put my camera away. After all, there will always be another opportunity.

ISO 200, 50mm, Freelensed, 1/500

ISO 200, 50mm, Freelensed, 1/500

all content and images © Gina Yeo Photography, 2019

8 Mistakes I Made as a New Photographer

When I first began my photography journey I made a lot of mistakes.  That’s okay, really! I truly think a person learns from making mistakes. A person can also learn from information and so I’ve gathered together some of the mistakes I made as a new photographer to give you a little food for thought.

1. Shooting at slow shutter speeds

This is probably the biggest mistake I made when I jumped from shooting in auto to manual mode. I didn’t quite understand the importance of a fast enough shutter speed.  Shutter speed controls motion in your images so it’s really important to ensure that you maintain a fast enough shutter speed to freeze not only the motion of your subject but your own movement as you capture your image. Rule of thumb when it comes to shutter speed is, try to keep that shutter speed above 1/160 if your subject is very still, like asleep still. Personally, I do not like to set my shutter speed below 1/200 and prefer 1/250 if I have a still subject. Now when it comes to a moving subject I like to keep my shutter speed at least 1/800.  I prefer to go higher if I can.

Now having said that playing around with shutter speed can be extremely fun and will introduce creativity into your images. You can try panning and other creative slow shutter techniques, like long exposure, as a means to feed your creativity.

Here are two examples of shutter speed. In the first image, the shutter speed was fast enough to freeze her motion and the movement in the drapery. In the second image, the shutter speed was slow which blurred the movement in the water and clouds in the sky. A tripod is a necessary tool when capturing long exposure landscape images.

ISO 640, Freelensed with a 50mm 1.4, 1/2000ss

ISO 640, Freelensed with a 50mm 1.4, 1/2000ss

ISO 100, 35mm, 13f, 127sec

ISO 100, 35mm, 13f, 127sec

2. Using a wide open aperture

I remember purchasing my first pro lens.  I saved my pennies and bought a Nikkor 50mm 1.4. I was really excited that I could now open up my aperture to 1.4 and so I did that. At the time I did not understand the relationship between aperture and depth of field.  Aperture significantly effects depth of field.  Depth of field is what is in focus or how big your slice of focus will be.  Another factor that impacts depth of field is how close you are to your subject and your focal length.  I’d open up my aperture to 1.4 and then I’d shoot a close up of my subject. I didn’t understand why my subject was not fully in focus and why only one eye or half the face was. I understand now that a large aperture (f1.4) will have a small area of focus and a small aperture (f22) will have a large area of focus.

Now shooting wide open has a purpose and is a wonderful creative technique to use when you want a small slice of focus to bring visual attention to only a part of your image.

ISO 400, 50mm, 1.4f. 1/800

ISO 400, 50mm, 1.4f. 1/800

3. Thinking that a high ISO would ruin my images

One of the reasons I was shooting at an aperture of 1.4, when I first started, was because I was concerned that a higher ISO would ruin my images. Yes, it is true that a higher ISO will add some noise, or a grainy texture, into your images however noise is always preferred over an out of focus or blurry image due to a poor choice in aperture or shutter speed.  There are noise reduction options in post processing that can really help reduce noise. I often shoot at ISO 2000 or even higher in low light in order to ensure I make good choices about my exposure triangle.  

ISO 5000, 35mm, f4, 25sec

ISO 5000, 35mm, f4, 25sec

4. Not understanding the relationship between light and mood

I had a big moment of learning when it was brought to my attention that there is a significant relationship between light and mood. I’ve always been fascinated by light but it was a long way into my photography journey before I understood that light impacts mood. Brightly lit images are more likely to evoke happy and energetic moods while low light is more likely to evoke peaceful or tension filled moods. It’s not only important to find and use good light within your images but it’s also important to think about the mood within the light.  A smiling happy child might seem out of place in a low and minimal light situation.    

ISO 800, 50mm, 1.6f, 1/500ss

ISO 800, 50mm, 1.6f, 1/500ss

5. Using actions or presets without tweaking

Actions and presets can be incredibly useful in post processing.  They can help a photographer cohesively edit a series of images, maintain a style and speed up workflow. However, very often actions are not one click and will likely need some tweaking. It is best to learn what an action or preset will do to your SOOC (straight out of camera) image before using it. It is also best to tweak most actions and presets.

ISO 640, 105mm, 2.8f, 1/400ss

ISO 640, 105mm, 2.8f, 1/400ss

6. Wishing for more gear

Gear does not make a photographer. It is the photographer that captures the image. Don’t get caught up in thinking that a different camera or a different lens will make you a better photographer.  Practise and learning the technical side of your camera is more valuable than any new gear.

A fun creative exercise to try here is to use a different lens then you’d normally choose in a situation and see what you can come up with!

ISO 500, 200mm, 3.5f, 1/1250ss

ISO 500, 200mm, 3.5f, 1/1250ss

7. Being afraid to ask for feedback

Putting yourself out there is really hard.  I understand this. However, asking for critique will help you learn and grow as a photographer.  Take the advice or leave it.  It’s up to you. Being open to the opinion of another photographer can certainly help you see differently.

ISO 500, 200mm, 4f, 1/640ss

ISO 500, 200mm, 4f, 1/640ss

8. Comparing

Theodore Roosevelt was absolutely right when he said, “Comparison Is the Thief of Joy". Comparing inhibits you from infusing yourself and your own unique artistic vision into an image. It’s impossible to create an image just like that of someone else. In the end you’ll only be doing yourself harm if you compare. Capture what you love in your own unique and beautiful way.  

GinaYeoPortfolio-32.jpg

all content and images © Gina Yeo Photography, 2019

The Dreaded Winter Photography Rut. 7 Tips to Help you Stay Inspired.

January can be tough.  The nights are long and the days are short. It’s often very cold up here in the Northern Hemisphere, especially where I live, and we are sometimes stuck inside with cabin fever. By this time of year we’ve already had a couple months of winter and with a few months to go before spring starts blooming we can start to feel kinda blue. 

I, however, actually love photography during the winter months!

Here are a few tips on how I stay inspired and avoid the dreaded winter photography rut:

1. Bundle up and head outside

There are plenty of days when spending some time outside is absolutely possible. Here, we bundle up in our winter gear and off we go. There’s a ton of fantastic childhood winter moments to capture and personally I love how those winter toques, that’s Canadian for hat, covers up unsightly hair! I have a small collection of colourful toques, mittens and scarves that I can pop on my children before we head out into the winter elements. My children play joyfully in the snow and I capture all those rosy red cheeks and fun snowy moments. They don’t seem to mind the cold like I do!  

Tip: Make sure your camera is protected from winter elements like wet falling snow. I use a plastic rain sleeve and it works great! You can find rain sleeves in most photography stores and through online retailers. 

ISO 1000, 35mm, f8, 1/320ss

ISO 1000, 35mm, f8, 1/320ss

2. Indoor treats

I don’t know if this is the case at your house, but at mine, after we’ve played outside in the cold a warm treat is always requested. Absolutely! As long as I can capture that moment with my camera.  

Tip: Capture details like those little fingers clasped around a warm cup of hot chocolate.

ISO 400, 35mm, 3.2f, 1/800ss

ISO 400, 35mm, 3.2f, 1/800ss

3. Bring the outdoors inside

Alright, I get it! The winter chill is not for everyone but snow and winter atmosphere can be gorgeous! I like to try and capture outdoor elements, like falling snow or a snowy backdrop, from the inside of my home. 

Tip: Try setting your exposure triangle for the brighter outdoor light allowing your subject to fall into the shadow or try a silhouette. This will allow for you to showcase the outdoors from the inside of your home.

ISO 200, 35mm, 2.8f, 1/200ss

ISO 200, 35mm, 2.8f, 1/200ss

4. Don’t be afraid to use artificial light

Natural light is at a premium during the winter months.  Often my children leave for school in the darkness of the morning and by the time they’ve settled in at home after school the daylight is almost gone. I’ve learned to enjoy embracing the challenge of artificial light. No I don’t have any fancy equipment here! I like to use light sources such as an iPad, computer or lamp.  

Tip: Use a high ISO to keep your exposure settings balanced. My ISO during the winter can be upwards of ISO 2000 or higher inside my home.  

ISO 3200, 35mm, 1.6f, 1/800ss

ISO 3200, 35mm, 1.6f, 1/800ss

5. Practise your low light photography

My house does not get a lot of bright natural light during the winter months with it’s position to the sun but what I do get are unique patterns of light. I’ve learned to embrace low light photography. 

Tip: Look for fun patterns of light that might only occur during the winter months. 

ISO 3200 35mm, 1.8f, 1/200ss

ISO 3200 35mm, 1.8f, 1/200ss

6. Take advantage of that early hour golden light

The light during the winter months is incredible. I find as the sun lowers itself to the horizon the light becomes soft and buttery in a stunning way.  I adore this type of light. 

Tip: Try faking a golden hour look.  It’s quite possible during the winter months because the sun is low to the horizon. Use a natural screen like a forest or treed backdrop to help filter some of the light during the day when backlighting your subject. 

ISO 200, 105mm, 3.5f, 1/1600ss

ISO 200, 105mm, 3.5f, 1/1600ss

7. Try something creative

Still feeling uninspired? Try getting creative. This is when it’s time to try that genre of photography you’ve always wanted to try, like macro or maybe landscape. How about trying to freelens? Do you have a Lensbaby you’ve been neglecting? What about shooting through something like glass or crystals. Trying something new is bound to stir up those creative juices and leave you feeling inspired!   

Tip: Don’t put expectations on yourself here! Just click away on your shutter embracing the potential for creativity.  

ISO 800, Freelensed, 1/500ss

ISO 800, Freelensed, 1/500ss

all content and images © Gina Yeo Photography, 2019

6 Tips to Capture Everyday Moments without the Overwhelm

ISO 400, 105mm, 3.2f, 1/2000

ISO 400, 105mm, 3.2f, 1/2000

Thank You!

Before I dive into sharing the photography tips I have for you, I want to thank each and every one of you for being here! This is my first blog post on The Photographer’s Notebook! Very exciting! I’m honoured and grateful that you’ve chosen to allow me to guide you in your photography journey!

Now let’s get to it! 

We are all busy. Our days are filled with routine and obligation. There isn’t much downtime. How in the world do we find that extra time we’ll need to capture those everyday moments before they pass us by?

It really isn’t that tough. I promise! Here are a few quick tips for you to use when you go about capturing your meaningful everyday moments.

1. Keep your camera in an accessible location

I like to ensure my camera is safe but visible. This keeps my camera easily accessible but also reminds me to pick up my camera and capture something in my everyday. I also like to have user friendly exposure triangle settings ready in my camera. This way I’m less likely to miss a moment. My user friendly settings for my camera inside my home are usually ISO 1000, SS (shutter speed) 250, f (aperture) 2.8 with a WB (white balance) of 5250 K (kelvin).

ISO 200, 35mm, 2.0f, 1/320ss

ISO 200, 35mm, 2.0f, 1/320ss

2. Keep a log with moments you want to capture

I love my photographer’s notebooks! I have quite a few. I am constantly jotting down notes, ideas and inspiration that come to me about how and what everyday moment I want to capture. If I’m feeling stuck or uninspired I take a quick look at my notes which are bound to motivate me to pick up my camera!

ISO 1600, 35mm, 2.2f, 1/320ss

ISO 1600, 35mm, 2.2f, 1/320ss

3. Schedule in an appointment with your camera

This might seem a little silly but trust me it works! You wouldn’t miss an appointment, right? Scheduling in a date with your camera prioritizes photography. It doesn’t need to be a long date. Short and sweet works. Try 10 minutes to start. Capture that simple everyday moment that you’ve been meaning to!

ISO 1250, 35mm, 2.8f, 1/160ss

ISO 1250, 35mm, 2.8f, 1/160ss

4. Bring your camera with you when you leave your house

My camera is not small. I find if I’ve made the effort to shove my camera into my purse and take it out of my house with me then I’m going to make the effort to use it. I enjoy nature. Being outside is invigorating so we go on a lot of nature walks. My camera is always by my side. My children have fun playing and I capture them doing just that. Wonderful, memorable, childhood, everyday moments preserved! Yes! Put it in the win column!

ISO 320, 125mm, 4f, 1/1600ss

ISO 320, 125mm, 4f, 1/1600ss

5. Change your perspective

This tip is fantastic for making the most out of a single photo shoot. Varying perspective to your subject will get you a ton of unique looks. A few ideas to try here:

  • Side light your subject

  • Front light your subject

  • Backlight your subject

  • Capture your subject from above

  • Capture your subject when looking up at him or her

  • Capture a close up of your subject

  • Capture your subject from far away

  • Capture precious details like eyelashes

ISO 500, Freelensed, 1/1000

ISO 500, Freelensed, 1/1000

6. Give yourself some grace

You do not need to be super human. There are days when picking up the camera is just not possible and that’s okay. Try again tomorrow.

ISO 400, 105mm, 3.2f, 1/800ss

ISO 400, 105mm, 3.2f, 1/800ss

all content and images © Gina Yeo Photography, 2019