Summer Details: Think Small-The Sensational Summer Series: Part 6

Summer details are the best! It’s time for dirty knees, sandy faces, bugs, flowers and all things tiny! Don’t forget to capture these beautiful memories! Little fingers are so good at discovering the mini world around us and I enjoy photographing it all.

1. Use the right settings

Summer details can be captured with any lens but one lesson of importance is specific to aperture and its relationship to depth of field or what is in focus within an image when shooting macro. The mini world is very tiny and you’ll likely be shooting at close range when capturing details. It’s important to remember that the wider the aperture the shallower your depth of field will be. Furthermore, the closer you are to your subject the shallower the depth of field. If you are shooting wide open and very close to your mini subject your focal plane will be very narrow. This is something to be aware of when capturing details so that your subject remains in focus. Typically, I choose to close down my aperture when I’m shooting details.

A super handy tool in these situations is a Depth of Field (DOF) Calculator. Many free DOF calculator applications can be downloaded right to your phone. DOF calculators allow you to input your camera settings and then will tell you how small or large your focal plane will be. This will help you ensure what you want in focus is actually in focus.

Another tip when it comes to settings is to simply be aware of your camera’s limitations when it comes to minimum focus distance. The minimum focus distance is the minimum distance you need to be away from your subject for your lens to achieve focus. If you are too close your lens will not focus on your intended subject. Sometimes it’s also helpful to shoot in manual focus if your camera is struggling or hunting for focus with a subject at close range.

ISO 200, 140mm, 3.5f, 1/500SS

ISO 200, 140mm, 3.5f, 1/500SS

2. Change up your perspective

Perspective is truly a powerful tool when it comes to composition. Remember to capture the mini world from a variety of perspectives. Try photographing your subject from straight on, from above, what about from underneath? Try super close or farther away. This not only adds variety but can infuse a ton of fun creativity and uniqueness into your captures. I’ve seen some really fun and creative looks of the mini world that incorporate fun tools like a magnify glass too.

ISO 100, 35mm, 3.2f, 1/250SS

ISO 100, 35mm, 3.2f, 1/250SS

3. Always consider light

A common theme in photography is the importance of ensuring the light quality within your image is good. There’s no exception to this rule when it comes to photographing the mini world. When I’m photographing something small I like to ensure that my tiny subject is in good light.

ISO 250, 105mm, 3.2f, 1/800SS

ISO 250, 105mm, 3.2f, 1/800SS

Enjoy capturing all things small!

Next week we move from the micro world into discussion about the grande world! Next week also concludes The Sensational Summer Series so be sure to check in so you don’t miss out on tips about how to go about capturing your subject within landscapes!